Essay topics about taming of the shrew

PETRUCHIO
Why came I hither but to that intent?
Think you a little din can daunt mine ears?
Have I not in my time heard lions roar?
Have I not heard the sea, puffed up with winds,
Rage like an angry boar chafed with sweat?
Have I not heard great ordnance in the field
And heaven's artillery thunder in the skies?
Have I not in a pitchèd battle heard
Loud 'larums, neighing steeds, and trumpets clang?
And do you tell me of a woman's tongue,
That gives not half so great a blow to hear
As will a chestnut in a farmer's fire?
Tush, tush, fear boys with bugs! (-213)

4. In general, the plots of Shakespeare’s plays follow a certain pattern, in which Act III contains a major turning point in the action and events that “inevitably” lead to the climax of action and the wrap-up of plot lines in the fifth and final act. How does The Taming of The Shrew conform to, or deviate from, this pattern? How substantially do the events of the third act—the marriage scene between Petruchio and Kate, and the wooing scene between Lucentio and Bianca—affect the action of the rest of the play?

More substantively, I don’t think the problem is one of outrage, or outrage culture. After all, you seem fairly outraged at Tuvalu’s treatment yourself. Instead, the issue seems to be what people do or don’t do with their outrage. It used to be that people used their outrage to write responses and critiques of those they were outraged at. Nowadays, people seek the removal of whatever caused their outrage. You see this here but also in campus culture more generally. From what I can tell, this is reflects a generational difference; millennials seem to want anything that disturbs or outrages them to cease to exist, and some non-millennial professors pander to this, wanting to be seen as woke or something. It’s all very troubling and ultimately antithetical to the philosophic enterprise.

"Among the many flashy costumes that update the lifestyles of the characters in The Taming of the Shrew for contemporary audiences at the Shakespeare Theater, no costume is more striking than the biker garb that Petruchio wears to his own wedding. It might be hard to appreciate Renaissance formalwear, but everyone can understand the white dress worn by Katherine on her wedding day. When Petruchio matches her beautiful dress with black leather instead of a tuxedo, he draws the surprise of everyone. Petruchio uses this attention to show everyone that he is controlling the fate of Katherine. Not only that, he shows everyone that enjoyment of the wedding depends on him. In fact the biker garb of Petruchio does more than strike fear into the wedding party; his upending of formalwear, of weddings, of the solemnity of a religious service, challenges us to acknowledge the fragility of our most carefully scripted experiences."

Essay topics about taming of the shrew

essay topics about taming of the shrew

"Among the many flashy costumes that update the lifestyles of the characters in The Taming of the Shrew for contemporary audiences at the Shakespeare Theater, no costume is more striking than the biker garb that Petruchio wears to his own wedding. It might be hard to appreciate Renaissance formalwear, but everyone can understand the white dress worn by Katherine on her wedding day. When Petruchio matches her beautiful dress with black leather instead of a tuxedo, he draws the surprise of everyone. Petruchio uses this attention to show everyone that he is controlling the fate of Katherine. Not only that, he shows everyone that enjoyment of the wedding depends on him. In fact the biker garb of Petruchio does more than strike fear into the wedding party; his upending of formalwear, of weddings, of the solemnity of a religious service, challenges us to acknowledge the fragility of our most carefully scripted experiences."

Media:

essay topics about taming of the shrewessay topics about taming of the shrewessay topics about taming of the shrewessay topics about taming of the shrew